Archive | October 2012

Unsystematic Observations on William Blake

I’m not exactly progressing at the pace of a clipper ship through Frye’s Fearful Symmetry, his study of William Blake. It’s more like tacking. I’m occasionally drawn up short by some unusual reference or remark that seems to run parallel to something found in the Seth books or in Castaneda, or which reminds of passages or remarks found in other books I’ve recently been reading. Then I scribble down a few notes and spend the rest of the day pondering over them. Here’s a few unsystematic jigsaw puzzle-piece observations that I hope to shape into a more comprehensive picture in future (say, by the time I finish Frye’s book?). Read More…

Blake’s Doctrine of Good and Evil

While I continue to read in Fearful Symmetry, I find I cannot credit everything in Northrop Frye’s interpretation of William Blake’s visionary poetry. While very often insightful, those insights often strike me as being incomplete or deficient in some respects. Frye is often contradictory, and particularly so when he attempts to grapple with Blake’s teaching on the question of good and evil. Since the meaning of good and evil is a topic of interest to us all, I suspect, let’s wade into Blake’s doctrine on the matter. I expect you might fnd this discussion provocative, if not eye-opening.

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The New Age

The so-called “New Age Movement” (if there be such a thing) has its detractors, generally conservative — even reactionary — champions of a status quo ante that has ceased to be viable or credible, and has long ceased to exist in its fantasized form in any case. The Modern Era is in process of passing away, and has been since the hand of World War reached into the course of human events and overturned them. Many people still do not realise or understand that the whole turbulent and destructive period from 1914 to 1945 took the form of World Revolution, which overthrew the Modern Era and is in process of replacing it with the Global or Planetary Era. The “West”, in any case, still thinks of the period as being a glorious victory of Modernity over all challengers and enemies. This was the premise of Francis Fukuyama’s “end of history” hypothesis. But it’s delusional.

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