Stormy Thoughts on a Stormy Morning

My thoughts this stormy, blustery morning come like the wind, in gusts and like the devil winds — in no particular order and perhaps with no common theme. They take me by surprise, push me around or swirl me about, and then drop me like a dry leaf. Uncanny (but beguiling) how my mental mood this morning resembles the weather “out there”.

So, here they are, also coming in gusts and bursts… random early morning thoughts and impressions in a storm.

I was reading an editorial in today’s Guardian (originally in The Observer) on the festival season in the UK. I was particularly caught by the reference to “satyrs” in the headline, “Festivals are a time to live, love and dance like satyrs“. Only yesterday, too, I had been awed by some of the creative “mutant vehicles” from Burning Man.

This association of festivals brought to mind the words of Nietzsche’s madman in the marketplace who muses on the murder of God:

“How shall we, the murderers of all murderers, comfort ourselves now? What was holiest and that the world has yet known has bled to death under our knives, and who can wipe this blood off of us? What water is there that can cleanse us now? What festivals of atonement, what sacred games shall we have to invent?’”

Seldom these days to we hear the words “mirth” and “merriment” spoken. Have we become too earnest? Too solemn? Too morose? Too banal? The Guardian editorial spoke of “Merrie England” as an ancient dream of a peasant utopia. Nietzsche also spoke of “gay science” or “mirthful knowledge” as the dance of the satyr. Mirthful science.

That’s it! Nietzsche was a satyr. That, of course, makes sense for this “disciple of Dionysus”. Nietzsche was much taken by the myth of the satyr Silenus and Midas. Silenus was the wisest of the Satyrs, and was even the tutor of Dionysus (just as — the contrasting parallelism is apparent — Aristotle was the tutor of Alexander the Great). Did Nietzsche take Silenus as his own model, perhaps? The Sileni were an older type of satyr who had the attributes of a horse instead of those of a goat (like Pan).

The thought swirls me about. Does this association of Silenus with the horse account for Nietzsche’s odd gesture as reported upon his initial breakdown in the streets of Turin, that he embraced a horse by the neck which was being whipped by its owner and, weeping, cried out “Brother!”?

But there is also the very embarrassing photograph that has come down to us of Nietzsche, Paul Ree and Lou Salome in which Ree and Nietzsche are yoked like horses to a horse-carriage while Salome holds the horsewhip. Nietzsche says he always regretted this photograph,

From left to right: Lou Salome, Paul Ree, and Friedrich Nietzsche

From left to right: Lou Salome, Paul Ree, and Friedrich Nietzsche

(There is a certain irony in this photograph, given Nietzsche’s remark “Are you going to visit women? Don’t forget your whip!” )

A devil wind of the mind swirls me around again….

I recently received a book I ordered by Stanley Rosen entitled The Mask of Enlightenment: Nietzsche’s Zarathustra. This will be interesting to read in conjunction with Jung’s Seminar on Nietzsche’s Zarathustra which I also now have.  The test of these two interpretations of Nietzsche will be whether they have properly interpreted Nietzsche as satyr. And what is a satyr but a coincidentia oppositorum? A creature “beyond good and evil” who is both divine and natural at the same time; a creature who is the intersection of the natural and the supra-natural.

To understand Nietzsche’s philosophy, I think, one must understand the meaning of the satyr and the dance of the satyr. Are we now also becoming self-conscious satyrs ourselves?  Is that, also, an interpretation of “integral consciousness”?

Another blast of mental wind….

I recently went to see the movie Godzilla. Why, I don’t know. I thought it was awful, even childish. But for some reason the memory of it arises in connection with my thoughts on satyrs and Nietzsche. I recognise the connection. The monsters of the movie are also “beyond good and evil”. They are simply, indifferently powers of nature, yet also divine.

Aha…! The underlying theme of the Godzilla movies becomes quite clear. The Nuclear Age has upset the ancient balance and equilibrium of nature. The Westerners in the movie feel they have to battle the monsters — the “rational” response, but using the same means that upset the equilibrium in the first place. Vicious Circle.  But the Japanese scientist insists that they should “let them fight” in order to restore the cosmic equilibrium. These ancient monsters are neither good nor evil. They are simply indifferent forces that belong to the law of the earth, and the shock of the nuclear age has upset and disturbed the law of the earth.

What lies implicit in the Godzilla story is Shintoism! Shintoism is a nature religion. The word “shinto” means “way of the gods” and these gods are all nature gods and powers. Shintoism is what the monotheistic religions would call “paganism”.

Shintoism and Buddhism have always existed in an uneasy relationship in Japan. It’s their version of the Jekyll and Hyde contradiction. The Shinto resurgence as the “national religion” and the rise of fascism in Japan are closely connected, just as the resurgence of Teutonic tribal myth and German Nazism are closely related. Buddhism in Japan was put on the defensive by the Shinto resurgence. Brian Victoria’s Zen at War in fact recounts the history of the shameful and corrupting compromises Zen Buddhism made with fascism, militarism, and Shintoism as “National Buddhism” or “Imperial Way Buddhism” from fear that Buddhism would be banned or suffocated by Shintoism as the State Religion. It wanted to prove its relevance.  It’s exactly parallel to what the Nazis called “Positive Christianity” by which they meant nationalist or tribalist Christianity — paganism; a self-negation, actually. “National Buddhism” and “Positive Christianity” both negated by their co-optation and compromise their own claims to represent a universal truth valid for all mankind. It was the renunciation and self-destruction of the principle of universality itself.

Shintoism in relation to Buddhism is reactionary, just as “Positive Christianity” was reactionary in relation to “catholicism” in the true sense of that word (“universal” or “the whole” — the holos).

Fascism is the resurgence of tribal, pagan man with his nature religion. He is not guided by ideology (reason) but by mythology. Or we can say, that the great neo-pagan resurgence (nativism) was the suppression of the mental-rational consciousness by the mythical and magical consciousness. That was the point of Viereck’s discovering “the roots of the Nazi mind” in Richard Wagner. But in what was Wagner’s consciousness rooted? It was in the very thing that led Nietzsche to reject Wagner and break off his friendship with Wagner. It wasn’t the fact that Wagner had become a Christian… but that Wagner had become “Reichsdeutsch” — ie, pagan. A self-contradiction.

Godzilla is one of the Shinto gods. It states that quite explicitly in the movie, in fact. He is an ancient god, one of the powers of nature — an ancient force who corresponds to the European dragon subdued by the Christian saints and angels.

Hmm! Another gust of mental wind knocks me about…

That’s exactly the “ancient force” mentioned by Seth as I quoted him earlier,

When, at this point now, of mankind’s development, his emerging unconscious knowledge is denied by his institutions, then it will rise up despite those institutions, and annihilate them. Cult after cult will emerge, each unrestrained by the use of reason, because reason will have denied the existence of rampant unconscious knowledge, disorganized and feeling only its own ancient force.

Godzilla is the image of this “ancient force”. One of the chthonic gods.

And, of course, we discussed this reptilian force in connection with David Icke’s “reptilons” or “lizard people” as the arousal or “awakening” of the reptilian brain — as a modern myth.

The return of paganism or of “tribal man” is said to be the implicit theme of Thomas Hardy’s Return of the Native as well as James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake. I’ve read neither of these, as yet. Marshall McLuhan, who wrote a great deal about the return of tribalism, kept pointing to Finnegan’s Wake as his proof, giving it the same pivotal historical status as Cervantes’ Don Quixote.

So, I’m brought back now to Stanley Rosen’s The Mask of Enlightenment on Nietzsche’s Zarathustra. I don’t want to anticipate Rosen’s interpretation — whether post-modernism is actually neo-paganism; or whether Nietzsche might be neo-pagan. As mentioned before, I think Nietzsche is less post-Christian than he is mostly pre-Socratic, because of the recurrence of Christian themes persist throughout all this philosophy. I think Nietzsche, however, was aware of the resurgence of pagan man and “the ancient force” and sought a way to try and integrate the pagan (the Dionysian) with the Apollonian consciousness. That integration or reconciliation is his “overman” or “transhuman”, or what Blake called The Marriage of Heaven and Hell.

Another devil wind of the mind whirls me about….

I noted before that Nietzsche plagiarised the Sufi poet and mystic Rumi. Nobody seems to have noticed this before. At least, I’ve never come across it being mentioned in reading other’s interpretations of Zarathustra. What he plagiarised from Rumi is, nonetheless, of great interest in itself — the symbolism of the serpentine or reptilian power as it appears in “The Snake-Catcher’s Tale” and “Jesus on a Lean Donkey”

It’s peculiar that Rumi’s poem “Jesus on a Lean Donkey” is one of that is seldom reproduced on the internet. It’s difficult to find a decent viewable version of it. It’s one of Rumi’s most profound poems. Here it is,

esus on the lean donkey,
this is an emblem of how the rational intellect
should control the animal-soul.Let your spirit
be strong like Jesus.
If that part becomes weak,
then the worn-our donkey grows to a dragonBe grateful when what seems unkind
comes from a wise person.Once, a holy man,
riding his donkey, saw a snake crawling into
a sleeping man’s mouth! He hurried, but he couldn’t
prevent it. He hit the man several blows with his club.The man woke terrified and ran beneath an apple tree
With many rotten apples on the ground.“Eat!
You miserable wretch! Eat.”

“Why are you doing this to me?”
“Eat more, you fool.”
“I’ve never seen you before!
Who are you? Do you have some inner quarrel with my soul?”

The wise man kept forcing him to eat, and then he ran him.
For hours he whipped the poor man and made him run.
Finally, at nightfall, full of rotten apples,
fatigued, bleeding, he fell
and vomited everything,
the good and the bad, the apples and the snake.

When he saw that ugly snake
Come out of himself, he fell on his knees
before his assailant.
“Are you Gabriel? Are you God?
I bless the moment you first noticed me. I was dead
and didn’t know it. You’ve given me a new life.
Everything I’ve said to you was stupid!
I didn’t know”
“If I had explained what I was doing,
you might have panicked and died of fear.

Muhammad said,
‘If I described the enemy that lives
Inside men, even the most courageous would be paralyzed. No one
would go out, or do any work. No one would pray or fast,
and all power to change would fade
from human beings’
so I kept quiet
while I was beating you, that like David
I might shape iron, so that, impossibly,
I might put feathers back into a bird’s wing.

God’s silence is necessary, because of humankind’s
faintheartedness. If I had told you about the snake,
you wouldn’t have been able to eat, and if
you hadn’t eaten, you wouldn’t have vomited.

I saw your condition and drove my donkey hard
into the middle of it, saying always under my breath,
‘Lord, make it easy on him.’ I wasn’t permitted
to tell you, and I wasn’t permitted to stop beating you!”

The healed man, still kneeling,
“I have no way to thank you for the quickness
of your wisdom and the strength of your guidance.
God will thank you.” – See more at: http://sologak1.blogspot.ca/2009/12/jesus-on-lean-donkey-poem-by-rumi.html#sthash.Bf7VU5bM.dpuf

Jesus on the lean donkey,
this is an emblem of how the rational intellect
should control the animal-soul.

Let your spirit
be strong like Jesus.
If that part becomes weak,
then the worn-out donkey grows to a dragon

Be grateful when what seems unkind
comes from a wise person.

Once, a holy man,
riding his donkey, saw a snake crawling into
a sleeping man’s mouth! He hurried, but he couldn’t
prevent it. He hit the man several blows with his club.

The man woke terrified and ran beneath an apple tree
With many rotten apples on the ground.

“Eat!
You miserable wretch! Eat.”

“Why are you doing this to me?”
“Eat more, you fool.”
“I’ve never seen you before!
Who are you? Do you have some inner quarrel with my soul?”

The wise man kept forcing him to eat, and then he ran him.
For hours he whipped the poor man and made him run.
Finally, at nightfall, full of rotten apples,
fatigued, bleeding, he fell
and vomited everything,
the good and the bad, the apples and the snake.

When he saw that ugly snake
Come out of himself, he fell on his knees
before his assailant.
“Are you Gabriel? Are you God?
I bless the moment you first noticed me. I was dead
and didn’t know it. You’ve given me a new life.
Everything I’ve said to you was stupid!
I didn’t know”

“If I had explained what I was doing,
you might have panicked and died of fear.

Muhammad said,
‘If I described the enemy that lives
Inside men, even the most courageous would be paralyzed. No one
would go out, or do any work. No one would pray or fast,
and all power to change would fade
from human beings’
so I kept quiet
while I was beating you, that like David
I might shape iron, so that, impossibly,
I might put feathers back into a bird’s wing.

God’s silence is necessary, because of humankind’s
faintheartedness. If I had told you about the snake,
you wouldn’t have been able to eat, and if
you hadn’t eaten, you wouldn’t have vomited.

I saw your condition and drove my donkey hard
into the middle of it, saying always under my breath,
‘Lord, make it easy on him.’ I wasn’t permitted
to tell you, and I wasn’t permitted to stop beating you!”

The healed man, still kneeling,
“I have no way to thank you for the quickness
of your wisdom and the strength of your guidance.
God will thank you.” –

Now, compare this poem to the chapter of Thus Spoke Zarathustra entitled “The Vision and the Enigma“. Clearly, Nietzsche has lifted this from Rumi, and identifies with the holy man himself. I once commented on this in the old Dark Age Blog in a post called “Nietzsche, Rumi, and the Terrible Secret”. (Some other bloggers were kind enough to link to the post, but it no longer exists). The terrible secret, the enigma, is also the mysterious something that Gebser refers to as “the law of the earth”, and which Rumi mentions a few times also in other places in his poetry, but which he never elaborates on.

Whatever Rumi meant by the terrible secret as too terrible for the human heart to bear, or Gebser meant by “the law of the earth”, or Nietzsche by his “enigma”, they largely remained silent about it. Even God remains silent about it.

I have a dark premonition of what that terrible secret is. But I think it might be prudent to shut up about it, too.

 

12 responses to “Stormy Thoughts on a Stormy Morning”

  1. Scott Preston says :

    O Brave New World!

    Just caught this on the Guardian news site “Facebook admits manipulating users’ emotions by modifying news feeds”

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/jun/29/facebook-users-emotions-news-feeds

    Poking and goading at the reptilian brain is going to have very bad consequences.

    • Scott Preston says :

      I might point out further that Marshall McLuhan anticipated this kind of potential for mass herding (for that’s basically what it is) over four decades ago, for dialing up levels of emotional agitation or cooling them down, and of certain interests doing “a tap-dance on our exposed nervous system” which is what the internet is, in effect.

  2. alex jay says :

    “I have a dark premonition of what that terrible secret is. But I think it might be prudent to shut up about it, too.”

    Why? Have you joined the Bilderbergers … an appendix to the “Fatima” prophecy … : )

    Oh … I get it: it’s probably a “national security” issue.

    Go on, share it.

    • Scott Preston says :

      Go on, share it.

      The “terrible secret” that is represented in symbols by “the worm”, “the black snake”, “the dragon” or all the horrors of Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos is the acknowledgement or presumption that there is in the human form an indwelling parasite or predator. The existence of this parasite also obsessed Castaneda in his later years, where he called the predators “the flyers”.

      This also appears to be connected with Gebser’s “law of the earth”, and his noted observation that the goddess of Reason, Athena, and the Gorgon are the same. It is also related to Heraclitus’ note that Dionysus and Hades are the same. The Gorgon might be an apt symbol of this parasite given that Rumi thinks knowledge of it would lead to human paralysis — absolute despair, even the rejection of all existence itself. Perseus can only defend himself against the Gorgon by seeing the Gorgon in “reflection” on his polished shield.

      Our sense for horror and of the ghoulish is an intuitive sense for the reality of the predator, and we erect “shields” against this recognition. In fact, “ghoul” (from Arabic ghul) is probably the right word for it — a soul eater.

      In North American aboriginal culture, this ghoul is called “windigo” or “weedigo”, a demon. it is represented as a cannibal spirit. So, the ghoul is quite common in legend and myth, and in many traditions is simply called “the Enemy”.

      Only in the later stages of his apprenticeship did don Juan revealed to Castaneda the purpose of the “warrior’s path” and the meaning of his “sorcery” — liberation from the predator.

      The best “shield” against the predator is disbelief. Disbelief is a shield. This was noted by the early European settlers who observed “windigo possession” amongst the Indians as a fairly common occurence (and it was), but wondered why it never affected Europeans. The only cure for windigo possession was execution. It was the sceptical attitude of the mental-rational consciousness that served as a shield against it, just as that sceptical attitude was a shield against the sorcery the Aztecs used against the Spanish.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wendigo

      As you can see from the description of the windigo, it is the exact equivalent of the Arabic djinn called “the ghoul”.

      Rumi seldom speaks of the predator directly, but often surreptitiously. The predator is always in the background of Rumi’s poetry, which is not poetry really but teaching. He drops dark hints now and then that what he is really teaching is emancipation from the predator, to draw the human away from the predator by his vision of the free spirit or an enticing paradise. But, for the most part, he avoids speaking of the predator directly (for example, the odd snippet of verse in his poem “Enough Words”)

      But that shadow has been serving you!
      What hurts you, blesses you.
      Darkness is your candle.
      Your boundaries are your quest.

      I can explain this, but it would break
      the glass cover on your heart,
      and there’s no fixing that.

      Consequently, Rumi never explains “it” — the terrible secret — at all, and only refers to it elliptically again in “Jesus on a Lean Donkey”.

      Rumi wants to encourage, not discourage. And he’s quite certain that pre-mature knowledge of the terrible secret would be so discouraging that human beings would become fainthearted and give up the will to live completely, so that even God remains silent about it — the horror that, if known too soon, would paralyse the human spirit.

      Therefore, I think it best not to dwell on the darkness or have our thoughts enter into orbit around the darkness and into morbidity, but to focus rather on the emancipatory message — the ideal of the free spirit.

      • Scott Preston says :

        By the way, the sceptical attitude isn’t always sufficient proof against the strange and uncanny things of this world. Given my own experiences also, I’m less inclined to be completely sceptical of the manitous, for example.

        Likewise, by way of example, I might mention a very strange and peculiar book called The Orders of the Dreamed, it being a compilation of letters home and journal entries by a young European fur trader named George Nelson who lived amongst the Cree and Ojibway around the turn of the 19th century, and who was stationed in my old stomping grounds near present day Lac La Ronge in Northern Saskatchewan.

        The letters and journal entries are really a marvel, because in many ways Nelson’s experience resembles Castaneda’s experience, and therefore serves as something of a corroboration of Castaneda. Nelson underwent some of the same initiations into the shamanistic consciousness which he recounted in his journals and his letters. It includes, also, an eye-witness account of windigo possession.

        There is also something very Blakean about Nelson’s visions.

      • alex jay says :

        “… acknowledgement or presumption that there is in the human form an indwelling parasite or predator. The existence of this parasite also obsessed Castaneda in his later years, where he called the predators “the flyers”.”

        — and L. Ron Hubbard (Scientology) called them “thetans”.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thetan

        I’m afraid the “terrible secret” isn’t much of a secret at all. It’s been perpetuated from time immemorium Personally (wearing my mental-rational shield), I’m more convinced by Mr. Hyde or Jung’s “shadow”. Still there are a lot of parasites gobbling up the soul out there – and I’m not referring to the Harry Potter version – but they’re called bankers (ghouls work as well). : )

        Have you finished your ark? (rhetorical)

        • Scott Preston says :

          LOL. That’s the first exposure I’ve had to Scientology doctrine. Like Icke’s doctrine, as theory it’s total bunk. As a modern myth, though, not so stupid. The real madness of these men is to have confused the theoretical and the mythological. Otherwise, as Blake put it, “everything possible to be believed is an image of truth”. But I’m afraid a lot of people will misunderstand and mistake that proverb.

          It’s not “thetans” in Scientology that are the parasitical, but what they call “body thetans”. This could be the equivalent of the ghoul, (possibly also the windigo). Seth also mentions such entities. He refers to them as “elementals”, which are attracted to and attached to very strong emotions — fear, pain, etc. — which they require as stimuli. They would appear to be the equivalent of what Castaneda’s don Juan called “inorganic awarenesses”.

          By themselves, though, and call them what you will, these “elementals” by whatever name wouldn’t be sufficient to break “the glass cover around your heart”. Whatever Rumi means by the “darkness” and “your boundaries are your quest”, it is the Horror of horrors.

          That brings to mind don Juan’s explanation of the warrior’s path and “the man of knowledge”– it is to balance the horror and terror of being alive with the wonder of being alive. That was, of course, Nietzsche’s own quest following his “stare into the abyss” — how to balance the awful and the awesome, as it were. For “awe” is the intersection or conjunction of the unspeakable with the inexpressible.

          That conjunction of the unspeakable with the inexpressible is Blake’s Marriage of Heaven and Hell.

          That’s the significance of Rumi’s statement “your boundaries are your quest”. Your boundaries, as such, are where the unspeakable meets the inexpressible, or what lies outside the circumference of our reason and the powers of speech to encompass and master, which is the place of awe. But awe is ambiguous.

          Nietzsche tested those boundaries. That’s what is great about Nietzsche. Man needs art to defend himself against the horror — the knowledge of the awful tragedy at the root of existence. That is also what you find in don Juan’s teachings — the essential tragedy of existence which can be countered only by “polishing one’s spirit” — like the shield of Perseus was highly polished so he could survive seeing the reflection of the Gorgon through it. As don Juan told Castaneda, one needs “guts of steel” to survive the path of knowledge, because the shock of the real is more than mortal man can bear.

        • Scott Preston says :

          Odd coincidence.

          Here’s a story from the creepyverse about an internet monster called “Slender Man”. By the description, he’s much the spitting image of the windigo and he is compared to “the ghoul”. The article in The Guardian mentions Tibetan “Tulpas” for comparison, which may be the equivalent of the indigenous “manitous”.

          The article, which omits a lot of detail, isn’t all that great in one respect. The author mentions that Slender Man embodies a “primal horror”, but offers little else apart from the suggestion that Slender Man, with all the attributes of a parasite, is the image of this horror itself. But why Slender Man should be considered a new “internet version” of the “primal horror” isn’t explained.

          http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/04/slender-man-online-character-wisconsin-stabbings

      • Scott Preston says :

        Also by the way….

        We don’t have to resort to Tibetan “Tulpas” or the indigenous “manitous” for comparison. There is also the Western tradition of the “egregore” (I mentioned this in an earlier post). The egregore would appear to be the same as the Tibetan Tulpa — a “thought-form”.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egregore

        The original “genius” was an egregore — the tribal tutelary deity, for as the word “genius” means in Latin — “of the tribe”.– of the gens and the word is related to the Arab djinn or “genie” (so is “Genesis”). George Nelson, in his aforementioned book on The Orders of the Dreamed called the indigenous manitous “Genii”. The Genii are egregores, also the manitous and are the equivalent of the Tibetan Tulpas. They also appear in Castaneda’s books and in the Seth material.

        Now, here’s the explanation for the existence of egregores/tulpas/manitous/ghouls, or call them what you will…. as I have heard it:

        As thought-forms (the creations of “imagination” in Blake’s meaning) they are energetic forms, and they require energy to sustain themselves just as all beings do. This energy they get principally from human beings. They tap human beings like we tap trees. This is the origin of “sacrifice”, and of the predatory or parasitical character of the egregores. Strong emotions, basically, are their “food” — emotions like fear, pain, and so on. Old manuscripts and records describe them as descending “like flies” on battlefields and sacrifices, and that is their association with the name Belzebub or Ba’al: He is “Lord of the Flies”, the egregore-in-chief, as it were.

        I leave it to you to draw the relevant conclusion from this explanation — the real name of the Lord of the Flies is “Man”.

        • alex jay says :

          “I leave it to you to draw the relevant conclusion from this explanation — the real name of the Lord of the Flies is “Man”.”

          My own conclusion – so far – rests on the anthropological origins of man’s need to explain why bad things happen ( i.e.evil), from the initial burden of surviving through natural cataclysms to its evolution as esoteric manipulations (many of which you cite) of whatever social structure by the priest class as a mechanism of control, power and self-relevance which is then perpetuated by a process of what historian, Arnold Toynbee calls “mimesis” (imitation from generation to generation) overtly or through a Jungian “collective unconsciousness”.

          Whether one visits Genesis 6:1-2 where the Elohim (son’s of God in some interpretations – though disputed by other Rabbinic scholars) procreated with “the daughters of man”, whose children then became “gibborim” or fierce and cruel chiefs filling he world with “blood and tumult” or its sci-fi version of extraterrestrials either procreating with women or genetically engineering our species ala Mr. Icke et al or everything in between, it boils down to the same premise that we as a species have been invaded and determined by a “foreign installation” and therein lies the bogeyman (parasite, virus (if one treats the human as nothing more than a biological computer) etc — somewhat like finding an al-Queda/ISIS or whatever nonsensical fear inducing invention they come up with from time to time under every bed. (Boy! that was a long sentence)

          The truth of the matter is that the “terrible” is Man’s reflection in the mirror, and the “secret” is that we can’t face up to it, but contrive scapegoats to absolve us of our own responsibliity – in other words delusion.

          Still, those nasty outside evil forces continue to capture the imagination … but wait! … the cavalry’s a commin’ – we’re saved – YIPEE!

          http://www.usnews.com/news/world/articles/2014/07/02/vatican-gives-thumbs-up-for-exorcist-association

  3. Scott Preston says :

    By the by, after yesterday’s storm, some 36 municipalities here in eastern Saskatchewan have declared states of emergency, due to flooding.

    We’ve had over two weeks of almost continuous rain, which is unheard of in these parts. We are typically semi-arid, but some places have seen over a foot of rain. The town in which I live, while it hasn’t declared a state of emergency, seems to be merely a floating island surrounded by sea.

  4. LittleBigMan says :

    “Fascism is the resurgence of tribal, pagan man with his nature religion. He is not guided by ideology (reason) but by mythology.”

    Enlightening.

    I didn’t see the new Godzilla movie mostly because all the film critics on the radio and television stations here were obsessed with how incredible Godzill’a screams were! So, I thought if the only thing worth discussing for these critics was Godzilla’s roar in the night, then I was not going to go see it.

    But I did go see “Edge of Tomorrow.” I think it was a dramatization of Seth’s revelation that we die many times before we are ready to move on from this plane of existence. In the movie, the alien species can only win if they are attacked. And boy are we humans good at attacking! So, our global war campaign against the aliens is actually destroying ourselves and the aliens are about to win the planet for themselves. Tom Cruise had to die and come back to life many many times (over 300 times I think) before he learned the secret of destroying the aliens. And when he succeeded, the nightmarish dreams of repeatedly dying and coming back to life stopped. It is basically a militarized and futuristic adaptation of “Groundhog’s Day.”

    So many excellent and exciting book citations. Thank you. I am especially interested in “The Orders of the Dreamed.”

    I think you were alluding to this and I agree with you that Facebook’s experiment of “emotional manipulation” will backfire for Zuckerberg. Humans manipulating other humans always does have that effect. He doesn’t know that the Zuckerberg that began college before the advent of Facebook was a more powerful personality that what he is now. But no, he won’t see that he has shrunk himself from what he was to a mere marketing tool. In his mind, he will fool himself by pointing out to his wealth and saying “I’m definitely more than what I was before Facebook.”

    How naïve!

    A word about Rumi’s “terrible secret” and Seth’s “elementals.”

    I can definitely feel them – not elementals per se – but entities that lurk just beyond my physical body, or inside my body, who knows, and among them “elementals,” too.

    The fact that emotions can be exhausting internally as physical labor can be exhausting externally, tells me that there’s something that works those emotions up. These are of course, thoughts, but where do thought come from?

    Jiddu Krishnamurti had an enlightening discussion with David Bohm about “thoughts” being the wall that is a major barrier between “The Brain” and “The Mind – with The Mind being the universal “Intelligence” and “insight.” Krishnamurti also says that when “thoughts” are quieted – not as a matter of deliberate meditation but as a matter of natural changing disposition – the thought barrier can be dissolved and a connection between The Brain and The Mind can be established. Only in this high state of energy, “insight” can flow from the Mind to the Brain.

    Krishnamurti calls this a “state of high energy,” which seems to be necessary in dealing with the elementals. So, as long as we are unable to “see” the ghouls, it is probably because we have yet not gathered enough energy within us to face them.

    And how about that Nietzsche, eh? I am debating myself, however, which is more practical to get rid of the snake, to puke it out or bite its head off 🙂 I don’t think it would be very easy to throw up a snake no matter how small 🙂

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